Dogs are haram in Islam

Dogs are not allowed inside the home

Keeping dogs at home:

“Is Keeping Dogs Haram in Islam? Exploring Islamic Perspectives on Dog Ownership?

In Islam, keeping dogs is generally prohibited, with the consequence of losing one or two qirats from one’s good deeds daily. However, exceptions exist for specific purposes such as hunting, guarding livestock, and protecting crops.

According to hadith narrations, exceptions are granted for using dogs in herding, hunting, and farming contexts. However, opinions vary regarding keeping dogs for other purposes like guarding houses and roads. Some scholars permit it, citing necessity and specific circumstances.

Regarding dog impurity, scholars differ in their views. While some consider dogs and their saliva impure, others differentiate between different parts of the dog, with saliva being the main concern.

Concerning purification rituals, Islamic teachings prescribe washing contaminated vessels seven times, with one of those washings using soil if available.

Moreover, physical contact with dogs, especially kissing, is discouraged due to health risks associated with diseases transmitted by dogs to humans.

In the hadith narrated by Imam Muslim (1575), Abu Hurayrah (may Allah be pleased with him) reported that the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “Whoever keeps a dog, except a dog for herding, hunting, or farming, one qirat will be deducted from his reward each day.” This hadith implies that keeping dogs in the home is generally discouraged in Islam, except for specific purposes such as herding, hunting, or farming.

In another hadith narrated by Imam al-Bukhari (5163) and Imam Muslim (1574), ‘Abd-Allah ibn ‘Umar (may Allah be pleased with him) reported that the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “Whoever keeps a dog, except a dog for herding livestock or a dog that is trained for hunting, two qirats will be deducted from his reward each day.” This hadith further emphasizes the restriction on keeping dogs in the home, except for specific purposes like herding livestock or hunting.

Another hadith highlighting the limitations on keeping dogs in the home is found in Sahih Muslim (Number 2944), where it is narrated by Abdullah ibn Umar that the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said, “He who keeps a dog other than one for hunting, herding, or farming will lose one qirat of his good deeds every day.” This hadith reinforces the idea that keeping dogs in the home for reasons other than specified purposes like hunting or herding is discouraged in Islam, with a decrement in one’s good deeds as a consequence.

In a hadith recorded in Sahih Muslim (Number 1577), Abu Huraira (may Allah be pleased with him) reported that the Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him) said, “Angels do not enter a house in which there is a dog or a picture.” This hadith underscores the general discouragement of keeping dogs in the home, as it suggests that angels, which bring blessings and mercy, do not enter houses where dogs are kept, except for those dogs trained for specific purposes like hunting or herding.

In another hadith found in Sahih Muslim (Number 1573), Abu Huraira (may Allah be pleased with him) narrated that the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said, “Whoever acquires a dog other than a dog for guarding livestock, hunting, or farming, will have two qirats deducted from his rewards every day.” This hadith further emphasizes the prohibition of keeping dogs in the home for purposes other than specified exceptions like guarding livestock or hunting, with a more severe consequence of losing two qirats of good deeds per day.

In conclusion, while Islam restricts dog ownership, exceptions exist for specific needs. It emphasizes cleanliness and caution regarding interactions with dogs to prevent health risks. Understanding and adhering to these guidelines are crucial for practicing Muslims.

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